Topic: RSS Feeds

Generally, RSS feeds is an XML file example: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/perl/synd … rssfull.pl
The Wikipedia has examples as well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSS

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<rss version="2.0">
<channel>
        <title>RSS Title</title>
        <description>This is an example of an RSS feed</description>
        <link>http://www.someexamplerssdomain.com/main.html</link>
        <lastBuildDate>Mon, 06 Sep 2010 00:01:00 +0000 </lastBuildDate>
        <pubDate>Mon, 06 Sep 2009 16:45:00 +0000 </pubDate>
 
        <item>
                <title>Example entry</title>
                <description>Here is some text containing an interesting description.</description>
                <link>http://www.wikipedia.org/</link>
                <guid>unique string per item</guid>
                <pubDate>Mon, 06 Sep 2009 16:45:00 +0000 </pubDate>
        </item>
 
</channel>
</rss>

The special XML-format file that makes up an RSS feed is usually created in one of a variety of ways.

Most large news websites and most weblogs are maintained using special "content management" programs. Authors add their stories and postings to the website by interacting with those programs and then use the program's "publish" facility to create the HTML files that make up the website. Those programs often also can update the RSS feed XML file at the same time, adding an item referring to the new story or post, and removing less recent items. Blog creation tools like Blogger, LiveJournal, Movable Type, and Radio automatically create feeds.

Websites that are produced in a more custom manner, such as with Macromedia Dreamweaver or a simple text editor, usually do not automatically create RSS feeds. Authors of such websites either maintain the XML files by hand, just as they do the website itself, or use a tool such as Software Garden, Inc.'s ListGarden program to maintain it. There are also services that periodically read requested websites themselves and try to automatically determine changes (this is most reliable for websites with a somewhat regular news-like format), or that let you create RSS feed XML files that are hosted by that service provider.

I mention ListGarden here is thier website: http://www.softwaregarden.com/products/listgarden/
It is free and open source.

To display feeds on websites Javascript is the best to use. Taking my orginal example feed from ecommerence here is what the code would look like with a few tweaked settings:

<script language="JavaScript" src="http://itde.vccs.edu/rss2js/feed2js.php?src=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ecommercetimes.com%2Fperl%2Fsyndication%2Frssfull.pl&chan=y&num=5&desc=1&date=n&targ=y" type="text/javascript"></script>

<noscript>
<a href="http://itde.vccs.edu/rss2js/feed2js.php?src=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ecommercetimes.com%2Fperl%2Fsyndication%2Frssfull.pl&chan=y&num=5&desc=1&date=n&targ=y&html=y">View RSS feed</a>
</noscript>

I created the code using a very nice Javascript builder made by the IT department at Virginia's community College.
http://itde.vccs.edu/rss2js/build.php

There are plenty more auto rss feed generators listed on google though:
http://www.google.com/search?ie=UTF-8&a … on+website


Hop all this helps to have a better understanding of XML, and RSS feeds. After you follow the world wide web consordium guidelines for creating rss feeds you can submit them to various websites for free, it will bring tons of traffic and boost your PR for google rankings.